Next level: Turning the worms food into edible dishes

19.01.2019

After working on plasticula for half a year and falling in love with my new (crawling) coworkers/room mates, we moved to Eindhoven to start working with Precious Plastic on their newest version.

Precious Plastic is a really cool project by the wonderful Dave Hakken which for the last five years consistendly tried to find answers for the plastic problem we are facing. For the last five years! Most people didn't even realize we had a plastic problem back then! Anyways, PP works on the issue by producing and researching machines and techniques suitable for small plastic recycling workshops. They havily rely on their online community, which they share all their knowledge, processes and results with. If you are interested to find out more about this amazing project, go here: www.preciousplastic.com

So at the beginning of october 2018 me and worm family moved to the Netherlands to help them introduce biomaterials and alternatives to plastic into the project. Arriving together with other 40 people from different backgrounds (designers, engineers, zero waste experts, even business people) and almost every continent, I spent the first weeks setting up the workspace and a small Lab for experimentation.

Then I started researching together with my teammate Marina (Industrial Designer from russia, currently studying at Aalto in Helsinki, a absolutly magnificent partner in crime!). We dove deep into the community and researched a lot of recipies online until we finally decided on a plan for the first weeks: We would start to make edible dishes from wheat bran!

I knew the material from my worms, since they often sit on it, when people breed them and knew that it was a by-product of the flour industry, that is not used fully to its potential. Plus we found a company from poland (biotrem) that started producing them in an industrial manner. So we were wondering: Could we hack and open-source this? So that people all over the world can start producing plates and bowl, which we can use instead of all the single use plastic trays.